Ferrari Building a Smaller, Lighter, Quicker Enzo

kianet over at Digg writes about a Wired story: “The go-fast gurus at Ferrari are working on a successor to the jaw-dropping Enzo that could be the lightest, quickest two-seater ever to roll out of Maranello.Ferrari sees lighter cars as the best way to reach its goal of increasing fuel economy 40 percent and reducing emissions 25 percent without compromising its reputation for performance.

My Alfetta’s curb weight is around 2700 lbs (1227 kg) and has about 110 hp (82 kW). I wonder what a 2200 lb (1000 kg) car that has 600 hp (447 kW) would be like.

(photo courtesy lozwilkes) read more

Too Many Wires

Alfa Romeo Sprint Veloce Audio Wiring

Since Kenny gave me the Alfa, I’ve had about three or four head units, connected to the two Kenwood KAC-7200 power amplifiers under the rear seat. Over the years, I’ve managed to screw up the wiring, so I decided re-wire it correctly, since I put in a freshly rebuilt 65 amp alternator (the stock alternator is 45 amps).

The first thing I did was connect two 10 gauge wires from the alternator to the battery charging circuit. For the power amps, I ran a new 12 gauge wire with an inline fuse from the battery to a relay.

Kenwood KAC-7200

This relay is switched on by the head unit when it is powered on using the wire from the Clarion that provides a positive 12 volt signal to the amplifier’s turn-on input.

Alfa Bodywork with PaintScratch.com

The driver’s door on the Alfa had a nice parking lot ding in it and rocker panel behind the front wheel well looked like Swiss cheese. Once again, I decided to fix something that professionals should be doing.

After sanding the dents and rot to bare metal, I used fiberglass, bondo and a polyester glazing putty to try to get everything straight. My Makita Orbital sander really helped in getting the edges of the glaze smooth. I used #320 disks for the finish sanding, though I had tried hand sanding before with up to #600. I couldn’t really feather the edges without the orbital sander.

Seth Malcolm, on the Senior Six Registry mailing list, mentioned PaintScratch.com a couple of months ago. I found the Alfa Romeo paint code (which was also on the trunk lid label) at the Veloce Registry. PaintScratch didn’t have the Alfa Romeo AR901 (Nero), but when I sent them the Alfa and Ditzler code, they offered to make a spray can for me for $25 (US).

Newly painted front door compared to existing paint on rear fender

After two coats of primer, I painted the door and rocker panel with the Paintscratch single stage paint. I had to use a heat gun to keep the surface around 70 degrees, because the temperature here was in the low 50s.

With four light coats, the color match is very good considering the original paint is twenty-eight years old. My results were a little orange peely (see top piture), but I’m pretty sure I don’t know how to paint. Paintscratch says on their web site that their “paint requires a final polishing with rubbing compound to make the paint glossy,” so I’ll give it a week or two to settle down before I compound it.

Newly painted Alfa Romeo Alfetta Sprint door and lower rocker panel

The rocker panel repair came out alright – but the dent repair looks OK if you’re near-sighted, don’t have your glasses on and you look at it from 10 feet away.