Riding a Bike on the Golden Gate Bridge

In this video, I’m riding my bike south towards San Francisco around the north tower of the Golden Gate Bridge. I used a GoPro HERO3+: Silver Edition to capture the video. The occasional clicking sound is the downshifting of my Campagnolo Chorus Ergopower controls.

In the video poster frame, you can see the water just outside San Francisco Bay in the gap between the orange barriers. That doesn’t help my acrophobia, especially knowing that there is a 227 foot drop to the water. And it’s only blocked by a temporary Cyclone fence.

There’s almost always a constant wind off the Pacific Ocean, blowing across the bridge to the east . This year, the bridge authority retrofitted the railings to withstand 100 mph gusts. Now, when the wind is >25 mph, the new sidewalk railings emit a deafening hum that can be heard miles away. Add the sound of cars and trucks three feet away going south at 50 mph, it’s not a wonderful experience.

I just try not to look to the right.

Fort Winfield Scott

Fort Winfield Scott, Presidio of San Francisco

From the National Park Service:

On June 19, 1912, Fort Winfield Scott was established in the western part of the Presidio as a coast artillery post and the headquarters of the Artillery District of San Francisco. Fort Scott housed seventeen Endicott-era gun batteries that were constructed, armed, and manned between 1891 and 1946. In 1922, Fort Scott was designated headquarters of the Coast Defenses of San Francisco, which was renamed Harbor Defenses San Francisco (HDSF) in 1925. As HDSF headquarters, Fort Scott controlled most other army forts in the bay area, including Forts Baker, Barry, Cronkhite, Miley and Funston. Only the Presidio of San Francisco and Fort Mason did not fall under Fort Scott’s command.