System Image Error 0x81000036

Using Backup and Restore (Windows 7), I had been unable to “Create a system image” using Windows Insider Program builds going as far back as build 18850. I am currently running Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 18963 (20H1) on a Boot Camp partition on a MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2012).

Attempting to Create a system Image would bring up the dialog box, “Where do you want to save the backup” and it would fail with another dialog box with the text:

Windows could not find backup devices on this computer. The following information might explain why this problem occurred:

(0x81000036)

Close Windows Backup and try again.

Windows 10 Insider Preview Create a system image error 0x81000036

I searched the Windows Insider Feedback Hub, googled the web and Microsoft forums and I didn’t find a solution until a few days ago. On the Feedback Hub, in a post with the title, “Cannot create System Image in build 18956 FIX IT!“, CJH suggested disabling Windows Sandbox and virtual machine. (This link opens the Windows 10 Feedback Hub)

After disabling Windows Sandbox (Control Panel/Programs/Turn Windows features on or off/Windows Sandbox) I was able to create a system image again. I initially disabled Hyper-V Manager but after re-enabling it, system image still worked.

MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2012) SSD Upgrade

MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2012) SSD Upgrade

In 2012, the MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2012) with a 256GB SSD sold for $2399. A speed bump to a 2.6 GHz Core i7 and a larger 512 GB SSD was $3099. That’s $700 for a modest CPU speed bump and an extra 256 GB of storage. I was always constrained for disk space on my MacBook Pro’s 256GB SSD because I use Boot Camp and rEFInd to run macOS betas and Windows 10 Insider Previews.

I knew that my MacBook Pro Retina (Mid 2012) used a proprietary storage drive connector, but until recently, I didn’t know that a standard mSATA drive could be used in it with an adapter.

I bought this SHINESTAR mSATA to A1398 Adapter and this Samsung SSD 860 EVO 1TB mSATA for about $180 and I had 1 TB of internal storage.

If you want to use the SSD drive you just removed from your Macbook as a backup drive or other external storage, the easiest solution is to just buy the $59 OWC Envoy Pro case for your SSD.

iFixit has a guide to replacing the SSD in the MacBook Pro 15″ Retina (Mid 2012). It’s a simple five minute process.

Why did I upgrade a seven year old MacBook Pro? My MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2012) was one of the first MacBook Pros with a Retina display. I bought it because of the Retina display and the quad core Core i7 (I7-3615QM), The third generation Intel Core processor, “Ivy Bridge,” has a 6MB cache on the CPU.

The Geekbench 4 (MC) score on the Everymac.com page for this computer is 10578. That Geekbench score is 30% faster than the latest 2018 MacBook Air – 7379. Even up to the Apple MacBook Pro “Core i7″ 2.8 15” Touch/Mid-2017, the Geekbench score was less than 14% faster (12069) the 2012 MBPr.

It wasn’t until the the 6 core processors debuted in the Macbook Pros Apple MacBook Pro “Core i7″ 2.2 15” Touch/2018 did the Geekbench (MC) score double – 21111.

MacBook

I bought a MacBook Core 2 Duo about a week ago. I bought it CTO (Configure To Order) with 2GB of RAM because I wanted to run some version of Windows. My last Apple laptop was a PowerBook G4 12″ rev. A, so the Macbook is a big jump in performance.

The only problem I’ve had was the DVD drive. DVDs and CDs wouldn’t mount on the desktop, though the drive showed up in the System Profiler. I was able to boot from the install DVD and ran the hardware tests with no problems. I reset the PRAM and then DVDs showed up on the desktop.

I installed Boot Camp and Windows Vista RC2 after it took me some time to figure out how to partition the 120GB HD into two Mac OS Extended partitions and one NTFS. I ended up using rEFlt for the boot menu and it works great. Vista runs with Aero on the Macbook’s Intel GMA 950 chipset. Performance is OK. The only problem is not being able write to the NTFS partition (reading works) when running OS X. Maybe someone will write a read-write file system similar to the NTFS for GNU/Linux.

I also installed Parallels (with a trial key) and Vista RC2. Even with 2GB RAM, system memory is paging out when Parallels is running so it seems that 3GB of system RAM would be ideal. Aero effects do not show up in Parallels with 2GB Macbook system RAM. Vista performance on Parallels seems to be about 75% of Vista on Boot Camp.

I used Michael Baltaks’ DoubleCommand and remapped the enter key to forward delete, so CTRL-ALT-DEL is now three keystrokes instead of four (fn-ctrl-option-delete).

I had no problems adding the MacBook, Boot Camp PC and Parallels PC to a Windows 2003 Server Active Directory. One thing I haven’t been able figure out is why a directory listing of a PC share is slower on the MacBook when I’m logged into the domain as opposed to logging onto the MacBook as a non-domain member.