Conzelman Road, Marin Headlands

Conzelman Road, Marin Headlands (GoPro HERO3+)

To do a little extra climbing on my short bike ride to Battery Townsley at Rodeo Beach, after I ride across the Golden Gate Bridge, I’ll ride down Alexander Avenue then south on East Road. East Road winds it way through Fort Baker past Cavallo Point Lodge and the Bay Area Discovery Museum to Center Road and Moore Road to the beginning of Conzelman Road. There, it’s about 15 ft above sea level near the Moore Road Pier, pretty much under the north end of the Golden Gate Bridge.

As Conzelman climbs up the headlands, it passes several scenic turnouts where all those generic Golden Gate Bridge photos (with the San Francisco in the background) are taken. The road climbs up Hawk Hill for almost 770 feet in a little less than 2.5 miles to the Marin Headlands Vista Point.

If you venture down the hill past the Vista Point parking lot, you’ll be rewarded with this view of the Marin Headlands, the Pacific Ocean beyond the Golden Gate and a brief but very steep 18% drop in the road.

Pharoah Sanders at Yoshi’s

Pharoah Sanders at Yoshi’s, November 29, 2019, with Benito Gonzales, Tabari Lake & Marvin Smitty Smith

The first time I saw Pharoah Sanders, he was performing live at Seventh Avenue South, the Brecker brothers’ jazz club in Greenwich Village. That was probably 40 years ago.

I’ve pretty much gone to see him every chance I had in New York Jazz clubs, probably at Sweet Basil, Fat Tuesday’s, the Blue Note, Lush Life, the Village Vanguard, the Village Gate, Seventh Avenue South, Iridium, et al and lately at Yoshi’s in Oakland and SF Jazz.

Campagnolo Super Record Headset

Campagnolo Super Record Headset

I removed the Campagnolo Super Record Headset from my blue De Rosa, in anticipation of getting the frame resprayed and installing the 2012 Campagnolo Chorus groupset that was on my Eddy Merckx, which I had replaced with a 2015 Campagnolo Chorus groupset. I may have changed the bearings a couple of times since it was installed in the early 1980’s.

Then I started thinking I should come into the 21st century and get a modern bike. After all, it’s been 20 years since the first Tour de France victory on a carbon bike, when Lance won in 1999 on a carbon fiber Trek 5500.

Sorting through all the choices is overwhelming and I start to think that I’d be really be happy with a titanium De Rosa Solo, but maybe not $7500 (for the frameset) happy.

iPhone 11 Pro Camera Lenses – Focal Length Comparison

Apple iPhone 11 Pro lenses (Photo: Apple Inc)

The iPhone 11 Pro phones come with triple 12MP Ultra Wide, Wide, and Telephoto cameras. The iPhone focal length of the lenses are 1.54mm, 4.25mm and 6mm. Their 35mm equivalent focal lengths are 14mm, 26mm, and 52mm, respectively. Cinematographer Newton Thomas Sigel gives a great explanation of the different effects of wide, normal and telephoto lenses.

iPhone 11 Pro Max Ultra Wide Camera – lens focal length 1.54mm (35mm equivalent: 14mm)
iPhone 11 Pro Max Wide Camera – lens focal length 4.25mm (35mm equivalent: 26mm)
iPhone 11 Pro Max Telephoto Camera – lens focal length 6mm (35mm equivalent: 52mm)

In the late 1970’s, I used the Nikon 13mm f5.6 lens on the Nikon F2 camera. The Nikon 13mm lens had a 118 degree angle of view and in its time, it was remarkable in that it was a rectilinear lens. The extreme angle of view opened up new creative possibilities in all types of photography including indoor, architectural and landscape photography.

iOS 13.1 Camera App screen – Ultra Wide field of view (Photo: Apple Inc)

The iPhone 11 Pro’s Ultra Wide camera angle of view is 120 degrees. When using the Wide and Telephoto cameras with iOS 13.1 camera app, the Ultra Wide lens enables a preview of what is outside the frame. This outside the frame information is also captured in the Wide and Telephoto cameras to enable post processing cropping without losing image information. This setting can be enabled in Settings -> Camera -> Photos Capture Outside the Frame.