Sintech CFexpress NVMe SSD Adapter

Sintech CFexpress Type-B to NVME M.2 SSD card, PA-CFEM2-N
Sintech CFexpress Type-B to NVME M.2 SSD card, pn: PA-CFEM2-N
The adapter includes six screws, a label and a storage case.

I use a Nikon D500 for some of my photography. When I first bought storage media, I started out with a Lexar Professional 2933x 64GB XQD card and a Lexar Professional 1000X 32GB SDHC UHS-II card. In late 2020, Nikon released a firmware update to give the D500 CFExpress Type B support.

In early February 2022, Tom’s Hardware had a story about an Adapter (that) Turns SSDs Into Cheap CFExpress Cards. The Sintech CFexpress Type-B adapter uses a NVME M.2 SSD. So I bought an adapter and a Western Digital 256 GB SN520 NVMe SSD.

Assembly only requires removing the label from the SSD, applying some heatsink compound to the cover of the adapter and screwing it together. Before I plugged the SSD into the adapter, I used a little DeoxIT on the contacts.

Sintech CFexpress Type-B to NVME M.2 SSD card, PA-CFEM2-N adapter, Western Digital PC SN520 NVMe 256GB SSD
Sintech CFexpress Type-B to NVME M.2 SSD card, PA-CFEM2-N adapter, Western Digital PC SN520 NVMe 256GB SSD

The adapter and 256 GB NVME M.2 SSD cost me about $90. A quick Google search for a SanDisk Extreme Pro 256 GB CFexpress Card Type B found the best price to be around $279. I also had to buy a Sony MRW-G1 CFexpress Type B / XQD Memory Card Reader for $100, so there’s that.

I was a professional photographer in New York City for 20 years (in the film era). I definitely would not use the Sintech card for an assignment where money was involved. I would use a memory card that’s on the Nikon approved list.

In the future, I will do some testing on the Sintech card and will add the results. For now, the card does work in my Nikon D500:

Nikon D500 Control Panel
Nikon D500 Control Panel showing 5.4k image count with the
Sintech CFexpress adapter and WD SN520 NVMe SSD

Easier Cycling Uphill – Modifying a Campagnolo Chorus Rear Derailleur

Campagnolo Chorus Rear Derailleur
Campagnolo Chorus Rear Derailleur 2015 11 speed

When I go on my bike rides, for some reason, I set a goal to climb 3000 feet (914 m). With the combination of my age (67.74 years) and weight (194 lbs, 88 kg, 13.86 stone), it started to get harder for me to turn over the pedals on steep (12%-15%) grades.

I’m riding an Eddy Merckx Professional frame with 2015 Campagnolo Chorus components. I set it up with an 11 speed Campagnolo Chorus compact crank with 50/34 chainrings and an 11-29 Campagnolo Chorus cassette, which had the lowest gear at the time. The wheels are Mavic Open Pro UST rims, Campagnolo Record hubs and DT Competition Double Butted spokes.

In the 11 speed range, Campagnolo is now offering a 11-32 cassette (11–12–13–14–15–17–19–22–25–28–32). I thought that the lower gear on the new cassette would make climbing easier but the maximum sprocket size for my Chorus rear derailleur with the short cage is 29 teeth. Campagnolo has a rear derailleur technical document with the specifications. (PDF)

Campagnolo makes a medium cage for the 2015 (and later) Chorus rear derailleur (p/n RD-RE102m, see page 19 of this Campagnolo parts document), so installing the medium cage would enable me to use the 11-32 cassette.

Campagnolo 11-32 Cassette, Chorus rear derailleur medium cage, short cage
Campagnolo 11-32 Cassette, Chorus rear derailleur medium cage, short cage

With the medium cage derailleur, 11-32 cassette and a new longer chain, I’m no longer killing myself to go up the 12%-15% grades, though the difference wasn’t as dramatic as I thought it would be. I could probably also accomplish a similar effect by losing 15 lbs.