Macbook Keyboard Rivets

Removing a broken MacBook keyboard

TLDR: can’t remove rivets; glue the new keyboard in with a medium thickness cyanoacrylate

The spilled coffee on my MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2012) disabled only one key on the keyboard. Unfortunately, it was the power button. I confirmed that my MacBook Pro wasn’t completely dead by shorting the pads on the system board that I found on insidemylaptop.com.

The top case (which includes the keyboard and trackpad) of the MacBook Pro can be replaced, with new parts on eBay that cost about $100. I also found that the just the keyboard can be purchased on eBay for about $20.

I used iFixit’s MacBook Pro 15″ Retina Display Mid 2012 Upper Case Assembly Replacement guide to disassemble the computer, then found some YouTube videos detailing ripping out the old keyboard.

MacBook Pro Retina keyboard rivets

The problem for me was when I pulled the old keyboard away from the top case, the rivets remained in the case. I later thought that pulling on the keyboard very sharply when I removed it would have pulled the rivets out too.

There were screws included with my replacement keyboard but the now the problem was how to remove the rivets from the top case. I found various solutions that included drilling them out, using a screwdriver and hammer to pry them out and removing the rivets by pulling them out with diagonal flush side cutters. The latter seemed like the best solution, except that I didn’t have that tool.

It then occurred to me that Apple reparability scores were always very low because they glued everything together. So, I decided to glue the keyboard in using a medium cyanoacrylate glue.

Working from one side of the keyboard to the other, I used less than a drop of glue on top of each of the protruding rivets. The glue (use a medium thickness cyanoacrylate) ran down around the rivet and under the keyboard mounting plate, fastening it to the top case. I pressed down on the keyboard for a few seconds to hold it flush with the top case until the glue set.

When I put the computer back together, I felt that gluing the keyboard in worked as well as the screws. Typing on the new keyboard felt completely solid and I saved a lot of effort in not having to remove the rivets.

I Dropped My Macbook Pro

isaligned display, MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2012)

I dropped my MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2012) on it’s corner. It didn’t cause any internal damage – the computer worked normally – but the the lid (with the display) became misaligned.

Display scraping, MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2012)

The misalignment made the lower right corner of the display scrape against the base of the computer whenever the display was opened. I thought if I could loosen the screws that held the display, I could realign the display with the base of the computer.

Loosen 6mm T6 Torx screws , MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2012)

I used iFixit’s MacBook Pro 15″ Unibody Mid 2012 Display Replacement (by Andrew Optimus Goldberg (and 5 other contributors) as a guide to remove the lower case and to get to the six 6mm T6 Torx screws holding the display (there are three in each corner).

The repair is fairly straightforward. The only tools that I needed were a Phillips 00 Screwdriver and a T6 Torx Screwdriver.

1. Remove the lower case. (10 Phillips screws)

2. – Note: the links to the following two iFixit links are to illustrate the location of the screws – the screws shouldn’t be removed.

Slightly loosen (do not remove !) all six (three on the left corner and three on the right corner) 6mm T6 Torx screws holding the display to the upper case.

3. Close the lid and move the display so it properly aligned with the computer base (the part that has the keyboard).

4. Tighten the six 6mm T6 Torx screws

5. Reattach the lower case.

MacFUSE file system is not available Error

I try to keep up with the latest Windows and macOSs by participating in the Windows Insider Preview program and the Apple Developer Program. I run both of these OSs on a Macbook Pro Retina (mid-2012). As of today, that is Windows 10 Build 16232.1000 and macOS 10.13 beta 2 (17A291m).

A lot of the time, things don’t work because I am running beta OSs with released apps.

One of the recent problems I encountered with macOS High Sierra (17A291j) was a kernel panic when I was using Paragon NTFS for Mac 15 with Dropbox (v30.3.14). I don’t know if it’s a good idea, but my Dropbox directory for both Windows and Mac is the same directory on an NTFS volume. Every time I started Dropbox, I would get a kernel panic. I opened a support ticket with Paragon Software and a few days later they sent me a new version that had the same problem.

For interoperability between the two OSs, read/write capability really helps. In the macOS (High Sierra), NTFS read/write capability is not native. I was very happy with Paragon NTFS for Mac 15 until I started getting kernel panics. On the Windows side, I haven’t found something that will read the Apple File System (APFS) in macOS 10.13.

With earlier versions of MacOS, I had used the open source NTFS-3g. When Paragon NTFS for Mac 15 stopped working in my situation with Dropbox, I decided to try the commercial version of Tuxera’s NTFS for Mac. This seemed to work ok until I installed the macOS High Sierra Developer Beta 2 Update 1 (17A291m).

On booting macOS, I would get the error message:

Aligned I/O enabled.
CBCIO enabled.
/System/Library/Filesystems/fusefs_txantfs.fs//Support/10.9/tufs/tufsfs.kext failed to load -… check the system/kernel logs for errors or try kextutil(8).
the MacFUSE file system is not available (71)

I traced this error to Gatekeeper in macOS 10.13. After I allowed the software, Tuxera NTFS for Mac started working again.

Allow software from Tuxera in macOS System Preferences Security & Privacy Setting

Updating the Raspberry Pi Webcam

I built a streaming webcam showing the view from my downtown Oakland apartment in November 2012. I used a Raspberry Pi (Model B Revision 1.0) and the Raspian Wheezy (2012-10-28) image. For the webcam/web server software, I used MJPG-streamer. The problem with MJPG-streamer is that if the images/stream is available on the internet, then anyone can access the software.

Recently my Raspberry Pi began to lose the WiFi connection. In researching various solutions, I disabled WiFi power management on the Edimax EW-7811Un nano-size USB WiFi adapter. That didn’t solve the problem. I switched to Ethernet but the connection still dropped.

I found a nice script for “Rebooting the Raspberry Pi when it loses wireless connection“. It’s a script that runs in crontab and checks for a network connection by pinging a local address. If the ping fails, it restarts wlan0.

The checkwifi.sh script worked great, but then I had an issue with the video stream image oscillating. The image would continually go between light and dark and the only way to stop it was to restart MJPG-streamer.

I decided to update to the current Raspbian Jessie with Pixel and some other webcam software. The Motion-Project seemed not to difficult – I could use it as a streaming webcam. I decided to use Motion 4.0 and Kenneth Lavrsen’s Motion 4.0 Guide to help set it up. I don’t know if the image oscillation is an issue caused by using the Creative Live! Cam Chat HD (auto exposure?) but this current setup seems to have resolved the issue.